Sub Zero Ice Cream & Yogurt owner Jerry Hancock figured out the secret to success is customization, and in 2004 he put his degree in chemistry to use by realizing liquid nitrogen can instantly freeze a substance, which would allow endless ice cream and yogurt combinations.

Nitrogen is one of 118 known elements and because it evaporates at low temperatures, it typically exists as a gas and in order for it to remain in a liquid state it must be kept at extremely cold temperatures. Liquid nitrogen boils at -321 F and freezes anything it touches, making this molecular gastronomy ideal for transforming milk and sugar instantly into ice cream. “We asked customers what they wanted and they all said they wanted ice cream,” Hancock says. “We knew we were going to have to be a destination and we were looking for something that no one else had done before.”

As one of North America’s largest seafood distributors, Pacific Seafood Group continuously emphasizes quality and cleanliness to guarantee freshness.

From its modest start in 1941 selling fish out of a car trunk, Pacific Seafood has since grown to employ more than 2,500 professionals at 37 facilities, with processing plants stretching along the Pacific Coast and distribution facilities in seven states. 

“Although the company has grown in size, it is still family-owned and family-focused while always being dedicated to delivering the best seafood products and the best customer service anywhere,” Pacific Seafood says.

Some sports personalities license their names to a restaurant and stop by every now and then for a free meal and to get a mention in the celebrity newspaper columns. For the most part, these celebrities are not involved with the restaurant’s day-to-day operations. That is not the case with Bob Baumhower, who had a 10-year career as a nose tackle for the Miami Dolphins of the National Football League (NFL) from 1977 to 1986. Before he had even retired, he knew he wanted to own a restaurant company, and the more hands-on, the better.

“I’m two-hands-on,” Aloha Hospitality International LLC CEO and founder Baumhower quips. He got hooked on the hospitality industry like a marlin in deep water when a friend took him to a Buffalo wings restaurant in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. He and a friend from high school soon opened their first wings restaurant.

In 1953, seven small dairy Co-ops on Canada’s Prince Edward Island banded together to create an organization they felt would best utilize their individual strengths and help them compete regionally against large producers. Today, that organization – Amalgamated Dairies Limited (ADL) – includes 180 dairy producers processing 97 percent of the milk produced on the Island.

In addition to producing one of the Island’s most recognizable brands of milk – which bears its name – ADL is also one of Canada’s largest specialty cheese processors. 

“Our main focus is co-packing – though we have our own local brand, we’re most successful with producing products for other companies,” Business Development Manager Chad Mann says. Customers include other dairy companies, retailers, foodservice organizations and branding companies. Products produced by ADL are consumed across Canada as well as in portions of the United States.

Thanks to its many offerings, Whitehall Specialties has become a leader in processed cheese products, cheese blends, substitutes and imitation/analog cheese production. The company serves the food processing, retail and foodservice industries and can customize products. 

“Natural cheeses are fabulous, but their functional characteristics generally can’t be adjusted,” President and CEO Mike Baroni says. “What focus on the innovation potential of non-standardized cheeses. We differentiate ourselves through our breadth of products and our ability to customize them to meet the exact needs of our customers.”

The company operates three Safe Quality Food-certified manufacturing facilities, two in Whitehall, Wis. and one in Hillsboro, Wis. It has more than 200 base recipes and top-of-the-line customization capabilities, allowing it to meet client needs for everything from functionality, shelf life, flavor and color to texture, packaging, cost and price stability.

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